The Law Office of Richard Vaznaugh

Experts in Workplace Rights for Bay Area Workers

505 Sansome Street, Suite 850
San Francisco, CA 94111
Phone: (415) 593-0076
Fax: (415) 653-8935

Contact Us

Contact Our Office

505 Sansome Street, Suite 850
San Francisco, CA 94111
Phone: (415) 593-0076
Fax: (415) 653-8935
Map/Directions

Our office at 505 Sansome Street is at the Transamerica Pyramid Center and on a contiguous block with the Pyramid tower.

Public Transportation: By Bart or Muni disembark at the Montgomery Station and walk north on Sansome Street for five blocks. Many buses serve the area including the “1” California which stops about one block from the office.

Parking: There is ample paid parking close to the office. Check the spothero.com app or webpage for availability. Metered on-street parking is possible, but difficult. Please note the City enforced time limits and other limitations. Our building garage is under the Pyramid and, unfortunately, does not accept visitor parking for security reasons.

Request a Consultation or More Information.

DISCLAIMER

You understand that no attorney-client relationship will exist unless we have agreed to represent you in a writing physically signed by an attorney from the Law Office of Richard Vaznaugh.

By sending us your communication, you agree that submitting unsolicited e-mail information to us does not form an attorney-client relationship with us by submitting that information.

Please do not to send us any information contained in an e-mail or any attachment that you believe is highly confidential until such time as we have indicated to you that we are able to review that information.

Please use the form below to request a consultation or additional information. Items marked with an asterisk (*) are required.




Is this this email address provided by your employer?





Were/Are you paid a salary or an hourly rate?




Did/Do you have an Employment Contract?

Did you sign an arbitration agreement with your employer?










Did you complain about the sexual harassment?


If your complaint is about discrimination, what type of discrimination? (check all that apply):












If your complaint is about sexual harassment or discrimination, have you filed a claim with the DFEH and/or EEOC?


Did/Does your employer keep track of your hours worked? (i.e., time clock, time cards)


If salaried, did/do you spend the majority of your time with managerial and administrative duties?

If salaried, did/do you earn at least $2,340.00 per month?

Were/Are you classified as an independent contractor?




Did/Do you get paid time and one-half for your overtime?

Were/Are you given paid 10 minute rest breaks for every 4 hours worked?

Were/Are you given unpaid meal breaks of at least 30 minutes for every 5 hours worked?

Are there other current or former employees that are in the same situation?


Vaznaugh Weekly Weekly

Topic of the Week

Workplace Bullying

Read more...

Blog of the Week

Overcoming Inequality in Unemployment Benefit Access and Utilization

Black workers are not only more likely to be unemployed during the pandemic but much less likely to receive UI. Law, policy, and practice may be the problems, but the solution begins with mobilization.

Thought for the Week

"It really is very damaging. It creates a place where you're just always afraid and you can't be yourself. People are angry and confused and they're concerned about their job all day every day—is today the day I'm going to be fired? That's just no way to live"

–Catherine Mattice Zundel | CEO of Civility Partners

List of the Week

from Workplace Bullying Institute

  • 19% of adults said they’d personally been bullied at work, while another 19% said they’d seen it happen to someone else.
  • Being bullied at work can harm both your mental and your physical health—with potential effects including major stress, anxiety, depression, trauma, high blood pressure, gastrointestinal issues, and more.
  • Workplace bullying goes far beyond a minor disruption or small annoyance. Rather, it creates a psychological power imbalance between the person doing the bullying and their target or targets to a point where that person at the receiving end develops [a] feeling of helplessness.

Top Five News Headlines

  1. Are you entitled to time off work to vote? Depends where you live
  2. The Fall Surge Is Here Setting Off Wave Of Workplace Mental Health Problems
  3. Texas social workers will no longer be allowed to discriminate against LGBTQ Texans and people with disabilities
  4. Seeking to even playing field with Uber and Lyft, San Diego loosening cab regulations
  5. How To Tell If Your Workplace Is Toxic

505 Sansome Street, Suite 850, San Francisco, CA 94111 • Phone: (415) 593-0076 • Fax: (415) 653-8935 •
Contact us today »