The Law Office of Richard Vaznaugh

Experts in Workplace Rights for Bay Area Workers

505 Sansome Street, Suite 850
San Francisco, CA 94111
Phone: (415) 593-0076
Fax: (415) 653-8935

The Law at Work: Links

  • Workplace Fairness, a non-profit organization working to preserve and promote employee rights: http://www.workplacefairness.org
  • Read common sense explanations of many California employment law issues by The Employment Law Center, a non-profit law firm offering litigation, counseling and advocacy in the area of employment law: https://www.las-elc.org/fact-sheets
  • Read about California overtime and other wage and hour laws from the State of California's Division of Labor Standards Enforcement: http://www.dir.ca.gov/dlse/dlse.html
  • You can file your own overtime or other wage claim with the State of California's Labor Commissioner – with procedures designed so that you can represent yourself: http://www.dir.ca.gov/dlse/HowToFileWageClaim.htm

         Note: Typically we recommend that a claim be handled by an experienced employment attorney. You should at least try to consult with a lawyer before filing such a claim. For smaller claims, a non-profit organization may be able to help. There are many such organizations including the Employment Law Center, with clinics in San Francisco, Berkeley and San Jose, the Hastings Civil Justice Clinic, La Raza Centro Legal and the Asian Law Caucus.
  • Read about California Anti-Discrimination Laws from the Department of Fair Employment and Housing, the State agency created to enforce and interpret those laws: http://www.dfeh.ca.gov/Complaints_EmpFAQ.htm
  • Before you can file a California discrimination or harassment complaint in court you usually have to file a discrimination claim with an administrative agency, such as the Department of Fair Employment and Housing ("DFEH"), first.

    You can set up an appointment to ask for an investigation here: http://www.dfeh.ca.gov/Contact.htm

         Note: The DFEH system is designed for unrepresented persons, but we recommend speaking with an employment lawyer before you file your claim. If you are close to the deadline (typically one year from the bad act) you should proceed on your own.
  • You can also file a complaint and request an immediate right to sue letter from the DFEH, here: http://esq5.houdiniesq.com/dfeh/intake/

         Note: Typically this should only be done by persons who are actually represented by an attorney.

The above information is provided as general information and does not constitute legal advice or an agreement of representation. No guarantee is made about departmental procedures as these may not apply to your particular case and are subject to change without notice. The law office does not agree to monitor or assist with claims that are filed by unrepresented individuals. We are not responsible for links being current or correct.

Vaznaugh Weekly Weekly

Topic of the Week

Sexual Orientation Discrimination

Sexual orientation discrimination can affect your job status, your working environment, your health benefits, and a host of other issues in the workplace. The law in this area is changing rapidly for the better. If you feel you might have been discriminat

Read more...

Blog of the Week

Why temporary layoffs may become permanent

Forty-two percent, or 11.6 million, of all jobs lost through April 25 due to Covid-19 will become permanent, according to the University of Chicago.

Thought for the Week

"We know LGBTQ people face higher rates of economic instability, higher poverty, lower rates of employment and higher incidence of pre-existing conditions. You can make a pretty reliable assumption that LGBTQ people are facing serious economic consequences from the pandemic. The idea that LGBTQ people could be more vulnerable simply because of who they are is unacceptable. It was already imperative that we enact these protections, and this crisis has laid bare how critical it is."

–harita Gruberg, director of policy at the Center for American Progress

List of the Week

from The National LGBTQ Advocacy Group Human Rights Campaign and PSB Research

  • 17% of LGBTQ people had lost their jobs because of COVID-19, compared to 13% of the general population
  • 1 in 3 LGBTQ respondents had their work hours reduced, compared to about 1 in 5 in the general population
  • 11% of LGBTQ respondents reported requesting rent delays, compared to 8% of the general population
  • 29% of LGBTQ respondents reported having access to paid medical leave if they or a family member were to get sick

Top Five News Headlines

  1. Amazon’s heavily automated HR leaves workers in sick-leave limbo
  2. Democrats say DOL keeping workers in the dark about paid leave
  3. Surprise unemployment drop sparks debate over how fast the economy will rally
  4. Don’t Let Your Partner’s Work Stress Become Your Own
  5. How to Address Unintentional and Unconscious Bias at Work

505 Sansome Street, Suite 850, San Francisco, CA 94111 • Phone: (415) 593-0076 • Fax: (415) 653-8935 •
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